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INSTITUTE FOR SUSTAINABILITY, ENERGY, AND ENVIRONMENT
UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN
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Building Resilience to Climate Change

iSEE Congress 2017

Sept. 18-20, 2017

Alice Campbell Alumni Center

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

#iSEECong2017

About the Congress

The purpose of this year’s iSEE Congress is to assemble leading national and international scientists from different disciplines to advance scientific understanding about state-of-the-art knowledge on the impacts of climate change on the agricultural sector, on ecosystem services, and on human livelihoods and wellbeing, particularly among the most vulnerable sections of society. The Congress will foster critical thinking not only of the challenges posed by climate change, but also of the areas for further research and institutional development to adapt to it. The event will provide a forum to discuss the near- and medium-term options for building resilience to climate change and policy directions that could contribute to long-term solutions.

Our previous iSEE Congresses have been attended by more than 300 faculty, students and others from across campus and stimulated critical thinking on the grand challenges facing society.

iSEE Congress 2017 is supported by generous funding from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a symposium in recognition of the Illinois Sesquicentennial — “The Research University at 150: Celebrating the History and the Future of Interdisciplinary Research at Illinois.”

The organizing committee included iSEE Associate Director Madhu Khanna and Illinois faculty members Elizabeth Ainsworth, Brian Allan, Jeffrey Brawn, Carla Cáceres,, Don Fullerton, Atul Jain, Stephen P. Long, Sarah Taylor Lovell, Jesse Ribot, and Gillen D’Arcy Wood.

Accommodations

Venue, Parking, and Travel

About the Congress

The purpose of this year’s iSEE Congress is to assemble leading national and international scientists from different disciplines to advance scientific understanding about state-of-the-art knowledge on the impacts of climate change on the agricultural sector, on ecosystem services, and on human livelihoods and wellbeing, particularly among the most vulnerable sections of society. The Congress will foster critical thinking not only of the challenges posed by climate change, but also of the areas for further research and institutional development to adapt to it. The event will provide a forum to discuss the near- and medium-term options for building resilience to climate change and policy directions that could contribute to long-term solutions.

Our previous iSEE Congresses have been attended by more than 300 faculty, students and others from across campus and stimulated critical thinking on the grand challenges facing society.

iSEE Congress 2017 is supported by generous funding from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign as a symposium in recognition of the Illinois Centennial — “The Research University at 150: Celebrating the History and the Future of Interdisciplinary Research at Illinois.”

The organizing committee included iSEE Associate Director Madhu Khanna and Illinois faculty members Elizabeth Ainsworth, Brian Allan, Jeffrey Brawn, Carla Cáceres, Don Fullerton, Atul Jain, Stephen P. Long, Sarah Taylor Lovell, Jesse Ribot, and Gillen D’Arcy Wood.

Accommodations

Venue, Parking, and Travel

Registration is open!

Secure your spot

Program

The Congress kicks off on the evening of Sept. 18 with a keynote from John Holdren, Former Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The following two days are packed with presentations from local and world scholars diagnosing our future in a new climate and strategies for mitigating and adapting to the planet-wide warming trend.

Check out the tentative schedule of speakers >>>

Students: Present your work at iSEE Congress 2017!

During two evening poster sessions, students and post-doctoral researchers will have the opportunity to share their research related to the nature of climate change, its impacts, and adaptation and mitigation strategies with a large and diverse audience. Poster submissions are being accepted now through June 30, 2017.

Register your poster with us via our web form. Note that in addition to filling out this form, we ask all poster presenters to email a headshot to sustainability@illinois.edu. Thank you!

Speakers & Panelists

Listed in alphabetical order:

Arun Agrawal

University of Michigan

Session VI: “Managing Risks and Vulnerabilities to Climate Change,” 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Brian Allan

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session III: “Land Use and Ecosystem Impacts of Climate Change,” 1:30-3 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Amy W. Ando

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session IV: “Adapting to Climate Change,” 3:15-5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Maximilian Auffhammer

University of California Berkeley

Session II: “Vulnerability of Agriculture to Climate Change,” 10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

 

Sandy Dall’erba

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session IV: “Adapting to Climate Change,” 3:15-5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: “Measuring the Economic Impact of Climate Change: Recent Advances and Remaining Challenges”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Dall’erba holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Pau, France. After an Assistant and Associate Professor position with tenure at the University of Arizona, he joined the University of Illinois in 2015. His research interests focus on regional science in general and economic growth, regional development policies, innovation and the economic impact of climate change in particular. In addition to the traditional estimation of the dynamics at work, he studies each of these fields by modelling and measuring the spatial interactions that take place between regions. An example would be the presence of spillover effects when regional policies are implemented to correct economic imbalances. In that purpose, he uses various tools of regional science but mostly spatial statistics, spatial econometrics and interregional input-output. He has published several articles on these topics and with those tools — some of them co-authored with his past and current graduate students – and he has been awarded various grants by NSF, NASA and USDA for my work. His research always attempts to provide a range of exposure to new curricula materials, methods of conducting interdisciplinary and international collaborative research and guidance in the preparation of material for dissemination in the public policy arena.

Joshua Elliott

University of Chicago

Session II: “Vulnerability of Agriculture to Climate Change,” 10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Kaiyu Guan

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session I: “Regional Climate Effects: Building Resilience,” 8:45-10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: “Impact and Adaptation of Agroecosystems to Climate Change in the U.S. Corn Belt”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Guan is an Assistant Professor in Ecohydrology and Geoinformatics in the Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences at Illinois, with a joint appointment as a Blue Waters Professor affiliated with the National Center for Supercomputing Applications (NCSA). He uses satellite data, computational models, field work, and machine learning approaches to address how climate and human practices affect crop productivity, water resource availability, and ecosystem functioning. His lab also has keen interests in applying domain knowledge and large-scale computing in solving real-life problems, such as large-scale crop monitoring and forecasting, water management and sustainability, and global food security. Guan got his Ph.D. in Environmental Sciences/Engineering at Princeton University in 2013. Before joining the Illinois faculty, he was a Postdoctoral Scholar working with Professors David Lobell and Joe Berry at Stanford University.

Justin Gillis

New York Times

Keynote Address 12:15-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Thomas W. Hertel

Purdue University

Session I: “Regional Climate Effects: Building Resilience,” 8:45-10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

John Holdren

Former Director of White House Office of Science and Technology Policy

Keynote Address 5-6:15 p.m. Monday, Sept. 18

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Atul Jain

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session III: “Land Use and Ecosystem Impacts of Climate Change,” 1:30-3 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Matthew E. Kahn

University of Southern California

Keynote Address 12:15-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Praveen Kumar

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session II: “Vulnerability of Agriculture to Climate Change,” 10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Robin Leichenko

Rutgers University

Session VI: “Managing Risks and Vulnerabilities to Climate Change,” 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: “Economic Vulnerability to Climate Change in Coastal Regions: Opportunities and Challenges for Building Resilience”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Leichenko is Professor and Chair of Geography at Rutgers University and co-Director of the Rutgers Climate Institute. She earned an M.A. in Geography from the University of Colorado, and an M.A. in Economics and a Ph.D. in Geography from Penn State University. Her current research explores economic vulnerability to climate change, equity implications of climate adaptation, and the interplay between climate extremes and urban spatial development. Leichenko served as a review editor for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report and as a contributing author on the IPCC Special Report on Extreme Events. She is a member of the editorial boards of Economic Geography, Growth and Change, Anthropocene, Urban Climate, and Journal of Extreme Events, and she is past chair of the Economic Geography Specialty Group of the Association of American Geographers. Leichenko has authored or co-authored two books and more than 70 peer-reviewed journal articles and book chapters. Her book, Environmental Change and Globalization: Double Exposures (2008, Oxford University Press), won the Meridian Book Award for Outstanding Scholarly Contribution from the Association of American Geographers.

Dion McBay

Monsanto Co.

Session VII: “Panel on Public-Private Actions to Adapt to Climate Change,” 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Clay Nesler

Johnson Controls

Session VII: “Panel on Public-Private Actions to Adapt to Climate Change,” 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Bill Northcott

Chief Innovation Officer, Agrible Inc.

Session VII: “Panel on Public-Private Actions to Adapt to Climate Change,” 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Donald Ort

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session II: “Vulnerability of Agriculture to Climate Change,” 10:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Christopher Preston

University of Montana

Session V: “The Human Impacts of Climate Change: Causes and Solutions,” 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Mark Rosegrant

International Food Policy Research Institute

Session IV: “Adapting to Climate Change,” 3:15-5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Julian Reif

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session V: “The Human Impacts of Climate Change: Causes and Solutions,” 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: “Air Pollution, Health, and Medical Spending”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Reif is an Assistant Professor of Finance and Economics in the College of Business and the Institute of Government and Public Affairs (IGPA) at Illinois. He is also a Research Associate at the U of I’s Center for Business and Public Policy, and a Research Economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His work has been funded by the National Institutes of Health, the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, and JPAL North America. His research interests include population health, health care, and public finance. His recent work includes research on the value of health and longevity, the effectiveness of social insurance programs, and the health effects of air pollution.

Jesse Ribot

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session V: “The Human Impacts of Climate Change: Causes and Solutions,” 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Daniel P. Schrag

Harvard University

Session III: “Land Use and Ecosystem Impacts of Climate Change,” 1:30-3 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: “The Timescale of Climate Change Impacts on Land and Ocean”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Schrag is the Sturgis Hooper Professor of Geology, Professor of Environmental Science and Engineering at Harvard University, and Director of the Harvard University Center for the Environment. He also directs the Program on Science, Technology, and Public Policy at the Harvard Kennedy School. His interests include climate change, energy technology, and energy policy. He has studied climate change over the broadest range of Earth’s history, including how climate change and the chemical evolution of the atmosphere influenced the evolution of life in the past, and what steps might be taken to prepare for impacts of climate change in the future. He helped to develop the hypothesis that the Earth experienced a series of extreme glaciations, called “Snowball Earths,” that may have stimulated a rise in atmospheric oxygen and the proliferation of multicellular animals. He is also interested in how we can use climate events in the geologic past to understand our current climate challenges. Schrag has worked on a range of issues in energy technology and policy, including advanced technologies for low-carbon transportation fuel, carbon capture and storage, and risks and opportunities of shale gas. He was named a MacArthur Fellow in 2000. He served on President Obama’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), contributing to many reports to the President, including energy technology and national energy policy, agricultural preparedness, climate change, and STEM education.

Gernot Wagner

Harvard University

Session IV: “Adapting to Climate Change,” 3:15-5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: “Solar Geoengineering as Adaptation?”

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Wagner is a Research Associate at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, a Lecturer on Environmental Science and Public Policy, the Executive Director of Harvard’s Solar Geoengineering Research Program, and an Associate at the Harvard University Center for the Environment. He wrote Climate Shock with Harvard’s Martin Weitzman (Princeton University Press 2015, paperback 2016), a Top 15 Financial Times McKinsey Business Book of the Year 2015, now also Austria’s Natural Science Book of the Year 2017; and But will the planet notice? (Hill & Wang/Farrar Strauss & Giroux 2011, paperback 2012). Wagner served as an Economist at the Environment Defense Fund (2008-16), most recently as its lead senior economist (2014-16) and member of its Leadership Council (2015-16). He holds a joint B.S. in Environmental Science, Public Policy, and Economics, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Political Economy and Government from Harvard, as well as a M.S. in Economics from Stanford. Wagner also serves as a term member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a consultant for EDF.

Molly Woloszyn

Extension Climate Specialist, Illinois-Indiana Sea Grant and Midwestern Regional Climate Center

Session VII: “Panel on Public-Private Actions to Adapt to Climate Change,” 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Donald Wuebbles

University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

Session I: “Regional Climate Effects: Building Resilience,” 8:45-10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Presentation title: Coming soon.

Abstract: Coming soon.

Bio: Coming soon.

Session Moderators

Listed chronologically:

Keynote: John Holdren, 5-6:15 p.m. Monday, Sept. 18

  • Evan H. DeLucia, Director of Institute for Sustainability, Energy, and Environment, Professor of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on DeLucia here.

Session I: “Regional Climate Effects: Building Resilience,” 8:45-10:15 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • Lisa Ainsworth, Associate Professor of Plant Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Ainsworth here.

Session II: “Vulnerability of Agriculture to Climate Change,” 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • Carla Cáceres, Director of School of Integrative Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Cáceres here.

Lunchtime Keynote: Justin Gillis, 12:15-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • Gillen D’Arcy Wood, Langan Professorial Scholar of Environmental Humanities of English, Professor of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Wood here.

Session III: “Land Use and Ecosystem Impacts of Climate Change,” 1:30-3 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

  • Jeffrey Brawn, Head of Department of Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Brawn here.

Session IV: “Adapting to Climate Change,” 3:15-5 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 19

Session V: “The Human Impacts of Climate Change: Causes and Solutions,” 8-9:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

  • Pradeep Dhillon, Associate Professor of Education Policy, Organization, and Leadership, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Dhillon here.

Session VI: “Managing Risks and Vulnerabilities to Climate Change,” 9:30-10:30 a.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

  • Ben Crost, Professor of Agricultural and Consumer Economics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Crost here.

Session VII: “Corporate Action on Climate,” 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

Lunchtime Keynote: Matthew E. Kahn, 12:15-1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 20

  • Don Fullerton, Gutgsell Professor of Finance and Institute of Government and Public Affairs, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. More on Fullerton here.

Accommodations & More

Venue
Alice Campbell Alumni Center

Alice Campbell Alumni Center

The Alice Campbell Alumni Center is located at Lincoln Avenue and California Street in Urbana, just south of the iconic Hallene Gateway Plaza (which marks the east entryway to the Urbana- Champaign campus). This facility is a warm and welcoming space perfect for soaking in the latest knowledge on how water, agriculture, and energy interact in our world today and in the future.

Address: 601 S. Lincoln Ave., Urbana, IL 61801

View on Google Maps or the Illinois Campus Map.

 

Alumni Center website

 

Getting here:
The Champaign Urbana Mass Transit District’s 22 Illini route will drop off passengers at the intersections of Illinois and Lincoln and Oregon and Lincoln — both just one block from the venue. The Red line will make a stop at Nevada and Lincoln, a block and a half away.

Parking is available at meters in nearby lots and along the street. Please be sure to read the specific instructions of your meter; each street and lot can be slightly different from others nearby. Stay tuned to this page for more details on parking availability.

Bicycle racks are available, and active transportation is encouraged.

 

Nearby eats: click for a map of places to grab a bite between sessions.

Air Travel

Willard Airport (CMI)

The quickest, easiest way to travel a long distance to the iSEE Congress is to fly into Willard Airport (CMI) in Savoy, a five-minute shuttle ride from the I Hotel.

Website

Poster Presenters

Students, postdocs and other researchers were invited to present posters during the evening receptions on Sept. 18 and 19. 

 

THE PRESENTERS

  • William Davies, Ph.D. Candidate, Mechanical Engineering: “Effect of California’s Carbon Cap-and-Trade Policy on Home Design” — This research analyzes the effectiveness of California’s carbon cap-and-trade policy at the micro and macro levels. At the micro level, it examines home design in Los Angeles to determine if the policy has a significant effect on design, cost, and carbon emissions for individual homeowners. At the macro level, it analyzes carbon price and emissions data to determine if the policy has provided a net benefit to the state. This paper uses publicly-available carbon price, emissions, and electricity price data from 2012 and 2014, two years after program initialization. The home is designed using the ZEROs software. The paper compares the quantity and cost of carbon emissions saved for both a hypothetical homeowner and the state’s power generation industry as a whole, and compares those to the estimated value of reducing carbon emissions. The price of electricity in California is found to have increased faster than the rate of inflation, and this would cause homeowners to reduce energy consumption, with a cost of $124/MTCO2e saved. Statewide cost of emissions saved is estimated to be $300/MTCO2e.
  • Rashi Singh, M.S. Candidate, Energy Systems Engineering: “Comparative Study of Different Business models of Solar PV for Rural Communities in India” — India is a country where about 300 million people still live without access to formal electricity, and where hundreds of millions more live with irregular supply through the existing grid network. The rely on kerosene lamps and diesel generators to meet their energy needs. The cost of installing electrical infrastructure to these remote communities is often unrealistic. Low-cost small scale Solar PV technologies offers an approach for electrification of some of the India’s most remote rural areas. The technology can be used in an economically favorable and environmentally sustainable fashion to solve the energy poverty of these rural communities. This paper provides a comparative study of different business models for Solar PV technologies and broadly discusses the technical, economic and social feasibility of these models in the rural communities of Uttar Pradesh.
  • Erik Stanek, M.S. Candidate, Crop Sciences: “A Participatory Approach to Improving the Design and Adoption of Multifunctional Perennial Cropping Systems in the Upper Sangamon River Watershed, Illinois” — Multifunctional perennial cropping systems (MPCs) are an agricultural system that utilizes various trees, shrubs, and/or perennial herbaceous plants to produce high-value food products and ecosystem services. Interest in these systems has begun to grow but the understanding of landowner’s design preferences and adoption motivators/barriers are not well understood. Earlier research on MPCs revealed that when considering the adoption of these systems, landowners lacked adequate information to make an informed decision. This study aimed to fill that gap by identifying MPCs design preferences, information needs, and adoption barriers/bridges of 15 landowners within the Upper Sangamon River Watershed of Central Illinois. To do this, participants received three alternative designs for their land, each based off a unique normative future scenario summarized by one of the following goals: (1) Production, (2) Conservation, (3) Cultural. Participants were given realistic design visualizations and information on management, ecosystem benefits, profitability, and marketability of the designs to test implications of land use transformations. Participants were surveyed before and after the design process, as well as directly participating in the design process. Results of the study will be used to help improve decision-making tools, system designs, and future strategies for facilitating the further diffusion and adoption of MPCs.
  • Krti Tallam, B.S. Candidate, Natural Resources and Environmental Sciences: “From the Visible to the Invisible: Patterns of Parasitism in Illinois Birds” — Populations of many bird species have been declining throughout North America, although the causes of decline are often unclear. Rapidly changing environments present novel stressors that may be driving these declines by negatively impacting the health of birds. Therefore, we assessed how avian health is affected by environmental stressors along an urban to natural gradient. One potential indicator of bird health is infection with parasites and pathogens. In order to understand how environmental factors impact infection levels, we have to establish a baseline for measures of parasite diversity and abundance. For this project, we conducted a literature survey of articles from the past century documenting parasites and pathogens in seven common shrubland birds: the American Robin, Brown- headed Cowbird, Eastern Towhee, Field Sparrow, Gray Catbird, Brown Thrasher, and Northern Cardinal. We provide parasite species lists for each host, examine shared infections among hosts, and provide a map of the geographic range of observations. Parasites of many hosts are understudied, and we explore how detection bias may limit our understanding of parasite diversity and abundance.